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Showing posts from January 17, 2021

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A God of Forces: JEDI, Weighed Against Ending its Cloud Project because of Amazon

During early Eastern Standard Time hours, today, the Wall Street Journal’s John D. McKinnon wrote Pentagon Weighs Ending JEDI Cloud Project Amid Amazon Court Fight ( link ). McKinnon wrote on Washington, District of Columbia soil, Pentagon professionals considered ending the JEDI cloud-computing project (in Software Engineering lingo, it is really a program, the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure): it is because Amazon.com Inc. has pushed litigation against it, and lawmakers are increasing their unfriendliness toward it. According to McKinnon, in 2019, Microsoft Corp. received the JEDI contract award, but Amazon contested this on court soil since then. On the Wall Street Journal, McKinnon continued: in April 2021, a federal judge refused the Pentagon’s demand to dismiss Amazon’s case, but the legal reasoning is unclear ( link ). Following this, Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks stated the Pentagon would review JEDI, wrote McKinnon. McKinnon stated Hicks’ statement was on Ap

Spectre and Meltdown Explained, and a Proposed Counter Against Them

On January 15, 2018, 2:58 AM PST, Josh Fruhlinger wrote Spectre and Meltdown explained: What they are, how they work, what’s at risk . As threats, regarding these two risks, Spectre and Meltdown, Fruhlinger wrote, “In the first days of 2018, published research revealed that nearly ever computer chip manufactured in the last 20 years contains fundamental security flaws, with specific variations on those flaws being dubbed Spectre and Meltdown ” (Fruhlinger, Jan 15, 2018). Fruhlinger was stating this: despite the best known efforts Electrical Engineers and Computer Scientists exercised, computer chip technology dated 1998 AD - 2018 AD has experienced an error, design flaws, that led to known defects, Spectre and Meltdown, and these are potentially great failures.  Side-channel technology requires high grade technical research, and this can be because Spectre and Meltdown exist, so a layman would not have known it, 22 years ago. According to Josh Fruhlinger, speculative execution and cac

RISC vs. CISC Architectures: Which one is better?

On January 8, 2018, Scott Thornton wrote RISC vs. CISC Architectures: Which one is better? Thornton stated, “RISC-based machines execute one instruction per clock cycle. CISC machines can have special instructions as well as instructions that take more than one cycle to execute” (Thornton, 2018). Thornton was saying this: between RISC and CISC architectures, the notable difference is instruction timing minus instruction breadth. In contemporary application, the RISC use case is more common because the instruction per-clock-cycle system is a software testing solution. The proof RISC is a software testing solution is software deregulation: Newcastle University School of Computing’s Brian Randall shared insights. Randall wrote, “It was perhaps only when, in 1969, IBM “unbundled” its software by pricing it separately from its hardware that software became a commodity; and a recognisable software industry, and the notion of package software started to come into existence” (Randall, May 201

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