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We Should Have Already Had This: The Lithium-Ion Battery With Built-In Fire Suppression

On October 22, 2020, yesterday, Dexter Johnson posted The Lithium-Ion Battery With Built-In Fire Suppression. Within this topic, Dexter Johnson regards a Stanford University research team and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (its former name was the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center[1]). Johnson stated:Now [Yi] Cui and his research team, in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, have offered some exciting new capabilities for lithium-ion batteries based around a new polymer material they are using in the current collectors for them. The researchers claim this new design to current collectors increases efficiency in Li-ion batteries and reduces the risk of fires associated with these batteries.[2]Johnson was saying this: fires are a current Li-ion battery threat that has been realized, but a new design can secure client use-case safety, and this required this battery redesigned. As this technology approaches marketplace entry points, this shall confront Li-io…

Stakeholder Contexts and Industry Standards: ISO/IEC 38500 IT Governance, but then an IT Compliance Framework


ISO / IEC 38500 IT Governance ^ Compliance


In information technology, standards for administration and enforcement of general applications are related to the International Organization for Standardization, or ISO, and the International Electrotechnical Commission, or IEC. The ISO/IEC 38500 IT governance and compliance framework is such a standard. According to A. L. Holt (2013), directors and senior officers understanding their responsibility for governing information technology systems addresses three issues: procured system integration, responding to legislative requirements for storing personal data, and documentation (Part A, Sec. 3). 

SMEs Linked to Measurable Successful Outcomes

With regard to small and medium-sized enterprises, or SMEs, Olaitan Olutoyin and Stephen Flowerday suggested that the IT governance structure and the operational governance processes are linked to measurable successful outcomes by three key pillars (2016). Olutoyin and Flowerday (2016) said that the three key pillars mentioned technology context of the enterprise, organizational context, and environmental context.

A O (n^2) Rate of Dangerous Change: Converting Target and Legacy Systems

On tangential rhetoric, a possible derivation of the collaborative research comments by Olutoyin and Flowerday is that the narrative of stakeholder involvement related to information technology governance frameworks and networking technology (link) implementations is quantifiable. In exposition, Satyam Tyagi (2016) reflecting that compromising a single low privilege user resulting in the entire Target enterprise compromised indicates Target not understanding legislative requirements for storage data involving integrating more secure systems and documentation for the legacy systems. Therefore, the worst-case is defending each low privilege user. The even worse case that should be replaced is probably a criminal hacker, a cracker, gaining access to any a parallelized system looping with the first loop getting the maximum user accounts then the inner loop injecting the malware used in the hack Tyagi reported in 2016: this is a worse case of n^2. Target’s situation contains similarity to Israel before Christ’s arrival regarding Achan (NIV, Jos 7:13). In response, Target would benefit from demarcating legacy systems that do not enable industry-standard security integrations (link). 

This is a sealed security vault
Image by 8385 on Pixabay

References 
Anonymous. (2016). JOBS MARKET: Me and my job. SC Magazine, 27(6), 15. 
Holt, A. L., Safari Books Online (Firm), & Books24x7, I. (2013). Governance of IT: An executive guide to ISO/IEC 38500. Swindon, UK: BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT. Olutoyin, O., & Flowerday, S. (2016). Successful IT governance in SMES: An application of the technology-organisation-environment theory. South African Journal of Information Management, 18(1), 1-8. doi:http://0- dx.doi.org.library.regent.edu/10.4102/sajim.v18i1.696

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