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Spectre and Meltdown Explained, and a Proposed Counter Against Them

On January 15, 2018, 2:58 AM PST, Josh Fruhlinger wrote Spectre and Meltdown explained: What they are, how they work, what’s at risk . As threats, regarding these two risks, Spectre and Meltdown, Fruhlinger wrote, “In the first days of 2018, published research revealed that nearly ever computer chip manufactured in the last 20 years contains fundamental security flaws, with specific variations on those flaws being dubbed Spectre and Meltdown ” (Fruhlinger, Jan 15, 2018). Fruhlinger was stating this: despite the best known efforts Electrical Engineers and Computer Scientists exercised, computer chip technology dated 1998 AD - 2018 AD has experienced an error, design flaws, that led to known defects, Spectre and Meltdown, and these are potentially great failures.  Side-channel technology requires high grade technical research, and this can be because Spectre and Meltdown exist, so a layman would not have known it, 22 years ago. According to Josh Fruhlinger, speculative execution and cac
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RISC vs. CISC Architectures: Which one is better?

On January 8, 2018, Scott Thornton wrote RISC vs. CISC Architectures: Which one is better? Thornton stated, “RISC-based machines execute one instruction per clock cycle. CISC machines can have special instructions as well as instructions that take more than one cycle to execute” (Thornton, 2018). Thornton was saying this: between RISC and CISC architectures, the notable difference is instruction timing minus instruction breadth. In contemporary application, the RISC use case is more common because the instruction per-clock-cycle system is a software testing solution. The proof RISC is a software testing solution is software deregulation: Newcastle University School of Computing’s Brian Randall shared insights. Randall wrote, “It was perhaps only when, in 1969, IBM “unbundled” its software by pricing it separately from its hardware that software became a commodity; and a recognisable software industry, and the notion of package software started to come into existence” (Randall, May 201

On Trust, Bias, and Privilege: my Response to 'Anti-Blackness is no glitch'

In Winter 2020, Stephanie T. Jones and Natalie Melo wrote ‘Anti-Blackness is no glitch’: The need for critical conversations within computer science education . Jones and Melo mentioned, “The conversation around and application of computer science often reinforces neoliberal ideals” (Jones, Melo, November 25, 2020, pg. 42). Jones and Melo were saying this: the computer science revolution and organizational IT network futuristic left-wing best standards access is telling. For Trust, I am Checking my Privilege But this is not excluding contemporary conversations: any futuristic conversation based on personal interpretation is not from ABBA, so it is not prophecy (NIV, 2 Peter 1:20). For your review, Peter wrote, "For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from [ABBA] as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit" (2 Peter 1:21). You, reader, can predict something shall happen, but prediction is uncertain: it is a terminating series ca

We Should Have Already Had This: The Lithium-Ion Battery With Built-In Fire Suppression

  On October 22, 2020, yesterday, Dexter Johnson posted The Lithium-Ion Battery With Built-In Fire Suppression . Within this topic, Dexter Johnson regards a Stanford University research team and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (its former name was the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center [1] ). Johnson stated: Now [Yi] Cui and his research team, in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, have offered some exciting new capabilities for lithium-ion batteries based around a new polymer material they are using in the current collectors for them. The researchers claim this new design to current collectors increases efficiency in Li-ion batteries and reduces the risk of fires associated with these batteries. [2]   Johnson was saying this: fires are a current Li-ion battery threat that has been realized, but a new design can secure client use-case safety, and this required this battery redesigned. As this technology approaches marketplace entry points, this shall c

On Self-Driving Vehicles, Re-evaluating Automation Levels

On October 18, 2020, Erik Stayton wrote "It’s Time to Rethink Levels of Automation for Self-Driving Vehicles" in the IEEE Society, SSIT (Society on Social Implications of Technology), and the magazine, Technology and Society. On media, regarding the future, Stayton agreed with Lee Vinsel. Regarding standards, Stayton wrote, “As the historian Lee Vinsel argues, standards are not just ways of classifying things. They are also attempts to shape the technological future. Thinking about how the structure of our standards contributes to their use is therefore crucial for making better policy decisions” (Stayton Sept 2020). Stayton was saying this: of the future, technology shall remain a part, but not its complete whole. Against humanity’s centralism is this: in authority, an ultimate media exchange. Without humans, media is another entity’s claimable target, but all human records are the bounty’s contents, too. As a history-based tool, its potency, replacing a human, is not really

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